FIX YOUR OLD JEANS

GIVE LIFE TO THAT FAVORITE PAIR OF OLD DENIM

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I've been there, and I know you have too. You have a favorite pair of jeans. Then life happens, time passes, and they fade, tear, and you're left searching for a fresh pair. But every time you try to slide in to a pair of "replacement" jeans, you just don't feel like yourself! Whether you're trying to milk that favorite pair and keep them alive a little longer, or just avoid the consumerist trap of fast fashion and buying new things, here are the three things I do that have revolutionized the denim game for me:

CARE FOR THEM PROPERLY UP FRONT
Some say the best care for denim is to only dry clean them, others say throw them in the freezer... and there are a million different "hacks" that you can google. But at the end of the day, the best thing you can do is, whatever your cleaning method, try and wash them only when absolutely necessary. Another consideration is to not carry too much crap in your pockets! The more that you carry in your pockets, the more things there are that your denim can rub against and cause holes and thin spots. Don't be afraid to carry what you need... but also pause and ask yourself if it's an actual NEED. An once of prevention is still worth a pound of cure! So take care of them, and they'll take care of you. 

RE-DYE THEM
Let me start by saying if you have a pair of jeans that has faded, that is probably a very GOOD thing. Those fade marks are like badges of honor and should be treated as such! But, if that coloration doe need some help... here's how. I primarily wear black jeans. Particularly Levis 510 -- and the 510's from BEFORE they changed the cut of their jeans (why oh why did you do that Levis?! Terrible idea!) Black jeans are notorious for looking old faster because the black pigment rubs and fades and suddenly they need TLC. Just hop to any store (literally almost any store... Safeway, Target, Walmart, Amazon...) and buy a bottle or RIT garment dye. You can also go to a craft store for wider selection of colors if you need something specific. The thing I do that's different than the instructions is this: Instead of adding the dye to the washer, I'll take a 5 gallon bucket (like the orange ones they give away at Home Depot) and fill it half full with hot hot water (boiling even) and add the dye. Drop the jeans in, submerging them and stirring them for 40-60 mins. I opt to do it this way rather than just adding the dye to the washer because I can get a hotter water temp and because it leaves the dye in a more concentrated format. Both of these things translate into your jeans soaking up a greater concentration of that dye! Wash the jeans with other black items in a small cold wash cycle with no detergent, and when that cycle is done, re-wash them one more time on another cold cycle with just a little detergent, then put them in the dryer and dry them at a medium heat. Voila - black as midnight and it cost you about four dollars and a little stirring while watching your fav Netflix show.

DARN THEM
No, I'm not using elementary school swear words towards my jeans. Darning is a means of repairing tears and holes! There are many places that will boast about garment repair -- but be warned, not all repair jobs are equal! Some places will simly lay the tear overtop of itself and sew it shut... this is awful. Some will take an actual patch of similar material and stitch it in. This is better. But the best option by far is proper darning. Darning is a technique that involves taking the tear or worn spot, trimming and cleaning it up a bit, then sometimes taking a neutral colored fabric that is similar in weight and feel as the original materiall, laying it inside the tear, and meticulously sewing it into the original fabric until it's grafted into the garment in a way that is almost seamless. To learn more about darning, watch this video.

 

SELVEDGE DENIM (and why it doesn't matter)

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Selvedge denim is all the rage. Pop in to any hip mens fashion boutique and you'll find some bearded gentleman with a cuff in his jeans, and on that cuff you'll see a fancy little edge (similar to the picture shown.) That fancy edge, my friends, is what defines those jeans as "sevledge". The term literally means "self edge".

Here's the deal: Every large roll of denim fabric has a small seam on the two outer edges. That seam (the self-edge) is what selvedge jeans like these are cut from. There is literally nothing else that is special about selvedge jeans! Now there is much that could be discussed about "types" of selvedge (i.e. Japanese selvedge and whatnot) but at the end of the day, there is nothing inherently different or special about the denim itself just because it's selvedge. It doesn't possess any special sauce, it's not more durable or long-lasting than any other denim per-se, or anything else. It's simply cut from the edge of the roll!

While having a nice clean seam on that cuff of your jeans is a lovely detail, and while I'm normally a details kind of guy, I'll be brutally honest: it's not worth it. Save paying nearly twice as much for that specific seam, and instead just focus on the cut of the jeans themselves. Your jeans will do a lot more for you if they fit right than they will if they have a tiny seam at the bottom.